sermons

“How then will they call on him in whom they have not believed? And how are they to believe in him of whom they have never heard? And how are they to hear without someone preaching? And how are they to preach unless they are sent? As it is written, “How beautiful are the feet of those who preach the good news!”” (Romans 10:14–15)

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The End of the Matter

(Ecclesiastes 12:9-14) In this, our last in a series on the book of Ecclesiastes, we step back and hear from the book narrator on the words of the Preacher. Why should we listen to the Preacher? And how can we become wise like him? A very relevant question for us today in a world of many voices telling us what it means to master life.

The End of the Matter

Why Do Good Things Happen to Bad People?

(Ecclesiastes 8:14-17, 9:11-12) This week the Preacher of Ecclesiastes wrestles with the reality of injustice in the world. Not only do bad things happen to good people, but good things seem to happen to bad people. What gives?! Is justice something we can ever really hope to see in this life under the sun? That's the question we're wrestling with this week.

Why Do Good Things Happen to Bad People?

Toiling for Your Mouth or God Occupied Joy?

(Ecclesiastes 5:10-6:9) This week our guest preacher, Leonce Crump, wrestles with the Preacher of Ecclesiastes words about money. Money is part of life, there's no getting away from it. But what role should it play in our lives? The Preacher pushes us to look honestly at the way we use money and the way it uses us. Ultimately what money does is expose the things our hearts desire most. And in the end we have to ask are we toiling for our mouths for are will living for God-occupied joy?

Toiling For Your Mouth or God Occupied Joy

Fear God?

(Ecclesiastes 5:1-7) Throughout Ecclesiastes, the Preacher has been searching for meaning in this life "under the sun". In our passage this week, he takes a surprising turn into the "house of God" and asks if meaning can be found through worship.

Fear God?

The Grace of Community

(Ecclesiastes 4:1-16) Today, our guide through Ecclesiastes, the Preacher uncovers the basic human need for community and yet the crookedness in the human heart that seems to make that very community impossible. Then we turn to the New Testament and how the coming of Jesus both affirms the Preacher's observations but also provides the necessary solution that makes real community possible.

The Grace of Community

The Grace of Work

(Ecclesiastes 2:18-26) Today we continue our series in the Old Testament book of Ecclesiastes.  Our guide through the book, the Preacher, meditates on the various frustrations related to our labor (or work) "under the sun". While the Bible is clear that work is good and an essential part of being human, our attitude toward it tends to get distorted in one of two directions: workaholism or apathy. In light of the fuller New Testament picture, those who trust in Christ can have a different approach to work, trusting in the goodness and redeeming hand of God in the midst of work's earthly frustrations.

The Grace of Work

The Pleasure Test

(Ecclesiastes 2:1-11) The "Preacher" of Ecclesiastes continues his quest for the meaning of life in a predictable place: the unrestrained pursuit of pleasure. While he succeeds in tasting the best life has to offer, it still comes up short in the end. In this sermon from Ecclesiastes 2:1-11, we explore several reasons why pleasure fails to satisfy, and how the cross of Jesus delivers us from this vain pursuit “under the sun” while also redeeming the genuine pleasures of life before the face of God.

The Pleasure Test

The Wisdom Test

(Ecclesiastes 1:12-18) In Ecclesiastes 1:12-18 we walk with the Preacher as he embarks on a series of tests to find the meaning of life. In this, his first test, he sets out to find meaning in life through wisdom. He shows his unique qualifications in doing so, but in the end finds that the search leaves him frustrated. Rather than helping with the quest, he finds that "in much wisdom in much vexation, and he who increases knowledge, increases sorrow."

The Wisdom Test

What's the Point?

(Ecclesiastes 1:1-11) This sermon begins a ten week series through the Old Testament book of Ecclesiastes, which explores the frustrations of life "under the sun." In this opening passage we are introduced to "the Preacher" and the conclusion to his quest to find the meaning of life: "Vanity of vanities," he says, "a chasing after the wind!" After observing the world around him from his perspective "under the sun" he concludes that finding meaning in this life is nothing more than a frustrating and pointless endeavor. Is he right?

What's the Point?